INBOX ZERO. Merlin Mann, who cooked up Inbox Zero, said, "Just remember that every email you read, re-read, and re-re-re-re-re-read as it sits in that big dumb pile is actually incurring mental debt on your behalf. The interest you pay on email you're reluctant to deal with is compounded every day and, in all likelihood, it's what's led you to feeling like such a useless slacker today."

Tabula rasa

What better way to start the year than with a clean e-mail slate?

I went through my e-mail accounts on New Year’s Day to process it back to Inbox Zero – the state it was in weeks ago, which I wrote about in a blog post here.

INBOX ZERO. Merlin Mann, who cooked up Inbox Zero, said, "Just remember that every email you read, re-read, and re-re-re-re-re-read as it sits in that big dumb pile is actually incurring mental debt on your behalf. The interest you pay on email you're reluctant to deal with is compounded every day and, in all likelihood, it's what's led you to feeling like such a useless slacker today."

INBOX ZERO. Merlin Mann, who cooked up Inbox Zero, said, “Just remember that every email you read, re-read, and re-re-re-re-re-read as it sits in that big dumb pile is actually incurring mental debt on your behalf. The interest you pay on email you’re reluctant to deal with is compounded every day and, in all likelihood, it’s what’s led you to feeling like such a useless slacker today.”

It took me less than a day to process the e-mails that had accumulated in December. It took much less time because I had done the grunt work in September. For weeks after that initial work, I was able to maintain the Inbox Zero state of my main e-mail account with regular reviews.

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Free web-based e-mail with terabyte storage

The idea is mind-boggling. What will you do with a terabyte of storage? I have a lot of e-mails in my archives, many with attachments, and yet my GMail inbox usage is only at 14 percent.

MailNation.net offers free e-mail with a terabyte inbox, that’s one thousand gigabytes. I doubt anyone can fill even a quarter of that capacity. MailNation limits attachments to 10MB, though. The service pledges a 99 percent uptime and they have statistics to back this up.

MailNation, however, does not allow you to use the account with Yahoo Groups. They warn that “if you choose to receive such emails, your account will be deleted without notice.”

Is this e-mail bloggable?

Here’s an interesting tip from Steve Outing in Poynter’s E-Media Tidbits: put an indicator in your e-mail signature whether your e-mail is private or “bloggable.” With most people owning blogs nowadays, Outing says “it’s worthwhile to make it clear when something you’ve sent in an e-mail is meant to be private.”

I tweaked my signature to be tagged private by default in case I forget to put an x in the appropriate box while discussing an embarrassing topic with someone through e-mail.

This e-mail is: [ ] bloggable [ ] ask first [x] private

(edited: changed blogable to bloggable. Outing, however, spells it as “blogable.”