Do you have a complaint against a Cebu newspaper? File it online

And here’s the link to the complaint form.

Our editor-in-chief, one of the driving forces behind the Cebu Citizens-Press Council (CCPC), asked me to build the council’s website in time for the Cebu Press Freedom Week celebration in September.

CCPC website CCPC WEBSITE, as featured in a recent issue of Philippine Journalism Reports. Click on image to enlarge.

The requirements for the site were simple: the ability to post articles and reports and an easy facility to get feedback–features easily managed by my favorite open source blogging platform, WordPress.

I briefly considered using another content management system (CMS) with more advance portal features, some form of document tracking or online file repository but the person tasked with updating the site said these aren’t needed. Complaints, she said, will be handled offline.

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Johnny-come-lately

I’m in Cebu Journalism and Journalists 2, a glossy magazine that comes out during the Cebu Press Freedom Week celebration. The magazine’s purpose is “to put between its covers people, institutions, and activities that have helped bring Cebu journalism to what it is now: dynamic and thriving.” Cebu Journalism and Journalists

I wasn’t initially picked to be among the journalists featured in the magazine. I was, in fact, the last to be included in the volume.

A few days before the magazine was to be sent to the printer, I arrived at the office in my usual getup: jeans and shirt with scruffy hair on a face untouched by razor for a few weeks. I was surprised to be told to fix myself up, borrow a polo shirt and have my picture taken.

I was then told to write something about myself and, being the hardcore blogger that I am, I couldn’t resist including my weblog URL in the text. My late addition caused the relegation of a big-shot Cebuano broadcaster from a full-page treatment in the magazine into just half a page.

Max Limpag My half-page of fame in the Cebu Journalism and Journalists magazine. Click to enlarge.

The journalists included in the magazine were also featured in a photo exhibit in Ayala Center Cebu. I wasn’t able to visit the exhibit, which ended last night, because the past few days have been hectic for me and my family. As expected, I got ribbed for the drop in sales at the mall as my picture was scaring shoppers away.

Manolo Quezon: Blogging is the salvation of print media

Manuel L. Quezon III is among the country’s top political bloggers. He describes himself as a “prototypical pajama blogger” working and blogging from home. During the House of Representatives’ vote on the committee reports dismissing the impeachment complaints against Arroyo, Manolo covered the proceedings from late afternoon until 4:00 a.m. when he collapsed in exhaustion. Below are transcripts of my email interview with Manolo for the “See it, hear it, blog it” article for Sun.Star Cebu during the Cebu Press Freedom Week.

Max: Professor Jay Rosen of the New York University said early this year that the question of bloggers vs. journalists is over. He says the “question now isn’t whether blogs can be journalism. They can be, sometimes. It isn’t whether bloggers “are” journalists. They apparently are, sometimes.” Do you agree with his statement? Do you see yourself as journalists in the mold of reporters producing original news content or more of opinion writers who comment on news items?

Manolo: In my particular case, I have always been an opinion writer (either as a columnist or editorial writer), or have delved into history. Whether history (examples would be my pieces on Edsa One or say, the American period) or reportage (reportage, to me, is a kind of literary form of the essay, I’ve been influenced in this view by Ryzsard Kapuzsinsky, by Tom Wolfe, Nick Joaquin, etc.), or opinion-writing, which includes both analysis and commentary (analysis is putting together events and circumstances to come up with an educated guess of future trends, or a prognosis on ongoing events; commentary is a synthesis of personal views and that of other people on a specific person or event).

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Sassy Lawyer: Blogging is a learning experience

Lawyer Connie Veneracion is more known by her online persona – The Sassy Lawyer. She runs The Sassy Lawyer’s Journal, PinoyCook and, with Abe Olandres, Pinoyblog. Veneracion recently started writing for Manila Standard Today as a print columnist – a rare transition these days when movements are the other way around – from print to online. Below are transcripts of my e-mail interview with her for my “See it, hear it, blog it” article for Sun.Star Cebu during the Cebu Press Freedom Week.

Max: Professor Jay Rosen of the New York University said early this year that the question of bloggers vs. journalists is over. He says the “question now isn’t whether blogs can be journalism. They can be, sometimes. It isn’t whether bloggers “are” journalists. They apparently are, sometimes.”

Do you agree with his statement?

Connie: Yes, in essence, I agree. But the validity of his observation has to be based on a set of givens.

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Abe Olandres: With blogging, everyone has a voice

Abraham Olandres runs some of the country’s most visited web logs: pinoyblog.com, pinoytechblog.com and yugatech.com. He is among the very few Pinoy bloggers actually earning enough from their sites to pay for web hosting and other expenses. Abe said in an e-mail interview that a month’s earnings from his Google AdSense account are enough to pay for a year’s hosting and domain expenses. Below are transcripts of my e-mail interview with him for my “See it, hear it, blog it” article for Sun.Star Cebu during the 2005 Cebu Press Freedom Week.

Max: Professor Jay Rosen of the New York University said early this year that the question of bloggers vs. journalists is over. He says the “question now isn’t whether blogs can be journalism. They can be, sometimes. It isn’t whether bloggers “are” journalists. They apparently are, sometimes.” Do you agree with his statement? Do you see yourself as journalists in the mold of reporters producing original news content or more of opinion writers who comment on news items?

Abe: Although I tend to make opinions on news, I find myself making the news or passing it up so that more people can be made aware of it faster. In that sense, one might consider the blogger a journalist.

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Ka Edong: Blogging has become another way for Filipinos to connect

Edwin Soriano runs Technobiography, last year’s Most Informative Blog awardee of the Philippine Blog Awards. His site is among the best online source for Philippine telecoms news and reviews. Ka Edong has recently transferred Technobiography to his own web server technobiography.edongskey.com. Below are transcripts of my e-mail interview with him for my “See it, hear it, blog it” article in Sun.Star Cebu for the 2005 Cebu Press Freedom Week.

Max: Professor Jay Rosen of the New York University said early this year that the question of bloggers vs. journalists is over. He says the “question now isn’t whether blogs can be journalism. They can be, sometimes. It isn’t whether bloggers “are” journalists. They apparently are, sometimes.” Do you agree with his statement?

Do you see yourself as journalists in the mold of reporters producing original news content or more of opinion writers who comment on news items?

Ka Edong: I see myself more in the realm of opinion writers who comment on news items.

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Interview notes on my blogging article

I will start publishing today my interview notes for the “See it, hear it, blog it” article printed in a Sun.Star Cebu Special Story during the recent Cebu Press Freedom Week. I would have started printing the notes last week but I was out chasing one deadline after another – including the launching of Sun.Star Cebu’s citizen journalists project.

Press Freedom Week ends and I get star-struck

The San Miguel Beer party of the Cebu Press Freedom Week is the only event I’ve consistently attended in the past few years of the annual celebration. It’s held on a Saturday, the last day of the celebration and my day-off from the newsroom.

Yesterday, Marlen and I attended the gathering. We met old friends and acquaintances including former colleagues in the Cebu City Hall beat. While we were watching the band playing that time (the lead singer’s strapless dress was about to fall off), more people started coming in. When I looked at who occupied the seats across us, I saw TV personality Angela Calina. She sat beside Cebu Daily News editor Niza Marias.

I told Marlen that I’d try to steal a shot of Angela for my blog. She said I was too obvious. I don’t know what got into me but I asked Angela if it’s okay that I take a photo of her for my blog. She said the photo should be of the two of us. I asked Marlen to take a photo and stood beside one of the most beautiful women in Cebu.

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Press freedom week and haute cuisine

This week is Press Freedom Week in Cebu. The event, held on the week where Sept 21 falls, is an annual gathering of Cebu journalists. The event traditionally starts with a march from City Hall to Capitol, this year it was from Capitol to the University of the Visayas. I missed last Sunday’s march because I wasn’t feeling well and I was struggling to meet the deadline for an article on blogging and journalism.

Last Monday, reporters were treated to a six-course lesson on haute cuisine at the Waterfront Hotel in Lahug, Cebu City. I was busy closing pages that night and had to content myself with a fine meal of canteen cuisine and an instant La Paz batchoy later.

On Wednesday, Sun.Star Cebu started its citizen journalists project. It has a web component run by, naturally, WordPress. Here’s a link to Sun.Star Cebu’s editorial announcing the project. This afternoon, Manolo Quezon will be addressing a forum in UP Cebu on Gloriagate. I checked the assignments log last night and saw that the forum was scheduled at 1:00 p.m. My wife and I are planning to attend the forum (that is if I wake up in time for it). Are other Cebu-based bloggers planning to attend this afternoon’s forum? Why don’t we meet there?