BBC releases blogging guidelines for employees

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) has released a guideline for its employees who maintain weblogs or websites. The guidelines, which can be downloaded as a Word document here but I’ve also reprinted it below, are noteworthy in that the BBC accepts that employees who blog “discuss their BBC work in ways that benefit the BBC.”Continue reading “BBC releases blogging guidelines for employees”

Free Expression in Asian Cyberspace conference: personal notes

Last week’s conference organized by the Southeast Asian Press Alliance (Seapa) in cooperation with the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) with the support of the Berkman Center Center for Internet and Society offered me a chance to meet bloggers and journalists from all over Asia. Time flew so fast for the conference–an indication thatContinue reading “Free Expression in Asian Cyberspace conference: personal notes”

Conference notes: podcasting, CMS, and don’t open Google Reader in the conference room

I’m learning a lot both in the sessions and off-session talks with participants of the Free Expression in Asian Cyberspace conference here at the Asian Institute of Management Conference Center. I had a long talk with Bryan Nunez, technology manager of Witness, a website that uses video to expose human rights abuses. Bryan is aContinue reading “Conference notes: podcasting, CMS, and don’t open Google Reader in the conference room”

Search engine optimization for journalists

“This Boring Headline is Written for Google,” that’s the headline of a New York Times article on how news organizations are starting to practice search engine optimization in the writing of headlines. The article says that news organizations increasingly see the need to optimize their site for search engine crawlers as search engine traffic accountsContinue reading “Search engine optimization for journalists”

The glass cannot be half-full

Either there is press freedom or not, according to Sun.Stars pooled editorial. The editorial points out the danger of making police the evaluators of media. Why do cops make poor evaluators? They dont know the craft and its nuances. Their mind-set is that of victims, whipped frequently by media for lapses and offenses. The paperContinue reading “The glass cannot be half-full”

A call for solidarity

For a few years now, the global media community has named the Philippines among the most dangerous places for journalists. In the past two years, our country has been second only to Iraq in the number of media killings. Philippine journalists have fought hard to roll back the tide of violence. Today, however, the PhilippineContinue reading “A call for solidarity”

MediaShift goes live

Update your blogrolls and RSS feed readers, PBS MediaShift is now live. The blog is run by journalist Mark Glaser, who previously wrote a column for Online Journalism Review of the USC Annenberg School of Communication. He also writes the OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. MediaShift “is a weblog thatContinue reading “MediaShift goes live”

Socialists and winos: the year in media errors and corrections

Regret The Error has published its annual roundup of top media errors and corrections. Its top correction of the year went to Denver Daily News’ apology for calling New Jersey ‘Jew Jersey.’ The typo of the year went to Reuters for reporting the recall of 94,400 pounds of ground beef panties. First runner-up is DallasContinue reading “Socialists and winos: the year in media errors and corrections”

Media doesn’t, media don’t

I changed the title of the post immediately preceding this from “Why mainstream media doesn’t get it” to “Why mainstream media don’t get it.” The word media, according to the Columbia Journalism Review’s (CJR) language corner, is plural. CJR, however, concedes that examples of the use of the word as singular are “practically infinite” andContinue reading “Media doesn’t, media don’t”