Zooomr offers free pro accounts for bloggers

Flickr competitor Zooomr is offering a free professional account for bloggers. All you have to do is open an account with their site, upload a photo to your account, use it in your blog post and then notify them.

Zooomr is an interesting Flickr alternative. I’ve just registered for it and after going through its features, it looks to me to be a better photo host for bloggers. Its free beta account gives you unlimited storage and a 50MB monthly uploading limit. Flickr, on the other hand, limits its free accounts to 20MB of monthly uploads and its photo streams to 200 images. ubuntu

Zooomr also resizes photos and gives you the links to the different image sizes. Zooomr’s pro account, which gives you a 2GB monthly upload limit, is $5 cheaper than Flickr’s at $20. TechCrunch describes Zooomr as “Flickr on steroids” in a blog article last March.

If you want to get a free pro account, here’s the instruction from the Zooomr blog:

“All we ask is that you host at least one of your images from Zooomr at your blog. This is easy. Sign up for an account. Upload an image. And then simply cut and paste the html code with the magnifying glass above your image and you’re all set. Once you’ve blogged one of your images paste the url into the comment section of this post and we’ll upgrade you to Pro.”

Personalize your free blog, website URL

If you’re using a free web or blog service like MySpace or Friendster, you’d have a long domain name like username. blogs. friendster.com /your blog name or www. MySpace.com/your username and some number.

This is fine when you’re just interacting in the Web, when all users have to do is click on a link to get to your blog. But when someone asks you for your blog address, can you just say it to him or her or do you have to write it down? Chances are, you’d need to write it down because of the length of the URL.

You can shorten your free blog or website URL by using redirection services. I’ve tried several redirection services in the past, when I was still using free website hosting. The problem with these services was that they’d put pop-up or pop-under ads or even a landing page. Enter URLdoctor.

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The world is watching. How do you say goal in Chinese?

First off, let me apologize for the lack of postings and failure to answer e-mails and comments. Three words: World Cup fatigue. I’ve also recently breached this blog’s monthly bandwidth allocation but Ploghost‘s Abe Olandres helped me keep this site up. If you ever need a Philippine web hosting company, Ploghost should be your first choice.

From PinoyPress comes this link to a New York Times article: “The World’s Watching – and, Perhaps, Cheering.” Journalist Carlos Conde was quoted in the article as saying: “If there’s anything that can be said of my country, it’s never crazy about football. Basketball, yes, as you know, but not football. There’s absolutely no buzz here.”

Football, sadly, isn’t as popular here in the Philippines as it is in the rest of the world but over the years, its popularity has grown in the island I now call home, Cebu. With live broadcast of matches restricted to pay-per-view channels, I’ve been catching some of the matches through Internet TV, using the TVUPlayer.

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Anti-spam plugin Akismet updated

Akismet, the anti-spam plugin created by WordPress founding developer Matthew Mullenweg, has been updated to version 1.15. The new version now tells you, via a tooltip, on which blog article or page a suspected spam comment or trackback has been posted.

When your mouse cursor hovers over the View Post link in the Akismet moderation panel, a tool tip will appear with the title of the post.

Iíve been waiting for the download link to be updated until early this morning. Hours after the blog article announcing the 1.15 update was posted, the download link still pointed to version 1.14.

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Mon.itor.us: an even more fantastic free web server monitor

A comment on my previous post on using Montastic and Site Uptime to monitor your web servers led me to mon.itor.us: a free web server monitor that I signed up to a few months back but quickly forgot because I encountered problems when I first used it.

I revisted my mon.itor.us account and boy is it turning out to be a great service. If you’re a website owner or a blogger running your blog in a web hosting account, you should use mon.itor.us to keep tabs of downtimes of your web servers. (click on photo to view larger image) mon.itor.us interface

In the few days since I re-activated my account, I found mon.itor.us better than Montastic and Site Uptimeís free service combined. When I first used mon.itor.us, it was really slow and I wasnít getting any idea thatís why I completely forgot about my beta account with the site. The site now loads faster and gives you a lot of data on the accessibility of the web servers you monitor.

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Fantastic free web server monitoring by Montastic

As a site owner or blogger, it is important to monitor the availability of your web servers. After all, what good is your content if readers canít access it because your web server is down?

For a long time, Iíve been using Site Uptime to monitor my blog and the other sites I help manage. Although most of these sites are hosted with PlogHost, a couple still arenít. I make it as sort of a condition to have sites hosted with PlogHost if someone asks me for help in putting out a website. I help run a few sites for free either because the site is owned by someone I know or I believe in their cause. (Note: The links above arenít affiliate links, Iím not sending you to the site because I get paid for it but because Iíve never had problems with its services.)

Site Uptime, is a free website monitoring service that alerts you whenever your web server is down. Its free service checks your site every 30 minutes and alerts you when it is unavailable. For a long time, I was satisfied with its service, getting alerts once in a while when a server has problems. That was until I discovered Montastic.

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Site overlay available in Google Analytics

I did not spot this feature in Google Analytics before but you can check which areas of your site or blog are being clicked by readers by using the service’s Site Overlay feature. I never dug deeper into the statistics of Google Analytics before and most of the time I just view the executive summary (click here to view screenshot).

I don’t know when Google Analytics started offering this feature since its announcement does not have a date of publication but the screenshot linked above, which I took on March 19, already displays a link to Site Overlay.

Google Analytics Site OverlayAs I was viewing my stats the other day while adding a new site profile, I got curious on what Site Overlay was and clicked on it. The feature, it turned out, tracks which parts of your site your readers are clicking on (click on photo to view larger image).

I had been solely using Crazy Egg to monitor my blog’s interface elements and the data it gathered were the bases for my decision to use this theme and take out the clutter from my blog design. Knowing where your readers click is very helpful in making design decisions. It tells you which elements or menu items aren’t working.

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Organize your life with Google

Google Calendar, launched just a few days ago, is a service I see myself using extensively. The first thing that grabbed my attention is the typical (for Google) uncluttered and simplified interface. Google Calendar is powered by Ajax, a web technology that allows the updating chunks of information in a web page without having to reload the entire page itself. This makes adding and editing calendar entries easy and unobtrusive.

The interface is intuitive and adding an appointment is easier than writing an email, which should be the case. To add an entry, you simply click on the box beside the time in the day column and type the details. You are not forced to configure the event like set up reminders or enter such details as venue or attendees. You can configure these things only if you choose to do so.

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My roundup of the best Sony Ericsson K750i themes

I change the themes of my Sony Ericsson K750i at least four times a week. I’m always in the lookout for great looking phone themes to download, especially animated ones. My taste in phone themes mirrors my taste in blog design, I love glassy buttons, transparencies and slashes in buttons or background graphic.

I depend on two sites for my K750i themes fix: MyK750 of Lasyk.net and Zedge. You can download themes from the two sites either into your PC or directly to your phone via WAP. Zedge limits PC downloads to 20 items a day-themes, ringtones, screensavers and movie clips. Lasyk doesn’t impose a PC download limit. Zedge requires you to register for a free account before you can download. Lasyk doesn’t require a registration.

I always download themes or ringtones into the PC so that I won’t have to pay for WAP access. I then transfer the files to my phone via Bluetooth or USB transfer

Here are my favorite Sony Ericsson K750i themes (screenshots after the jump).

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Printable CEO goes online: Color-code and assign points to your tasks

David Seah’s Printable CEO is an effective productivity tool. It allows you to focus on important tasks based on your hierarchy of values. The color-coding and the assignment of points make it easy to decide which tasks to prioritize. The accompanying tasks tracker helps you keep tab on the things you’ve done and the points you’ve earned.

I’ve long wanted to implement online the concept behind the Printable CEO. I’m not very good at doing things on paper, despite the fact that I work for a newspaper. I’ve frequently lost notebooks and pieces of paper containing jottings, notes, phone numbers and e-mail addresses. The longest paper-based organizer I’ve kept is my Pocketmod “Sony” edition. I keep a lot of blank Pocketmods in case I need to brainstorm when I’m away from the desk.

I already keep my notes online through ZiddlyWiki and it doesn’t make sense, at least for me, to depend on a paper-based task tracker.
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