Running Bon Echo Alpha; uninstalling Google Browser Sync

I have been using Bon Echo Alpha, the test version of the upcoming Firefox 2 release, these past few days and Google Browser Sync for a couple of weeks. Yesterday, I decided to stick with Bon Echo Alpha, removing my Google Browser Sync extension, which doesn’t work with the program yet.

Ive decided to stop using Google Browser Sync because I find Foxmarks more dependable in synchronizing bookmarks in the Firefox installations in the different computers I use: at home and in the office. At first, I found exciting the idea of synchronizing cookies, saved passwords and browsing sessions between different PCs.

I could just close my Firefox in the office without logging out of my mail or blog accounts and resume the browsing session at home, with all the tabs I left open when I closed Firefox in the office re-opened at home. But then I started encountering synching error and my bookmarks went awry, they were no longer synchronized. Ive never encountered these problems when I used Foxmarks.

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FEAC2006: technical notes

Since last year, I have been actively moving files that I need to access anywhere online, in an experiment to “make the network my computer.” This served me well during the recent Free Expression in Asian Cyberspace conference in Manila.

The greatest benefit is that the files I needed for things I was working on was accessible whichever computer I was using. I host all my files with, the best online drive I’ve tried so far. Streamload is a close second and I use it for backup.

I used one of the newsroom’s laptops in the conference and it was a plain vanilla installation. In a few steps, however, I turned it’s Firefox into the browser that I use at home and at the office. When I used one of the laptops set up by the organizers at the conference hall, I was also able to turn it into my familiar Firefox installation (after they installed Firefox): with the same bookmarks and bookmarks toolbar. I did this using Foxmarks, a Firefox bookmarks synchronizer. Foxmarks synchronizes all your bookmarks into a central server, so you essentially have the same set of bookmarks and bookmarks toolbar for each browser that uses your account.

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Color code your tasks using The Printable CEO as guide

David Seah’s printable CEO is an excellent guide on which tasks to tackle first and which distractions to deal with later. It lists various answers to the question: When is something worth doing? The answers are color coded and come with points, ranked based on their importance to your goals. Seah uses it to track his tasks using a printable progress chart that he fills up.

I use Seah’s printable CEO as guide but I do not keep track of the scores of my tasks. Instead, I use it as guide on which tasks to perform first. I organize tasks by topics and use color code, based on the printable CEO, to prioritize.

I then implemented this in BackPackIt using the Firefox extension Xinha Here, which launches a visual HTML editor for any text entry area (screenshots below). I edited the main page of my free BackPackIt account and used it as dashboard. For the body text, I entered my version of The Printable CEO and used color coding.

Continue reading → releases visual editor for blogs, which is turning out to be an excellent resource on blogging, released a Firefox extension that puts a what-you-see-is-what-you-get (WYSIWYG) blog editor in the open source browser.

I tried it out for a few minutes (screenshots below) and even used it to publish the previous post and found that it worked flawlessly. The editor allows you to assign your blog’s categories to your posts. It doesnt have a button, though, to allow you to split your posts the way the more link works in WordPress but since you can edit the code generated by the

You can just right-click on a web page you want to blog and launch the WYSIWYG editor. With the plugin plus the extension, Firefox now has the capabilities introduced by Flock.

The plugin visual editor works only in Firefox 1.5 and the following blogging services and platforms:

Blog services:

Blog scripts
Movable Type

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Instant WYSIWYG editor Xinha Here now comes with options

The developer of Xinha Here! has released version 0.4 of the must-have Firefox plugin for bloggers and online content creators. The new version runs only on Firefox 1.5 so if you haven’t upgraded yet, get the new installer at Mozilla.

The new version comes with options for the what-you-see-is-what-you-get (WYSIWYG) editor. The options interface allows you to specify plugins to use with the editor as well as the themes of the editing screen. The new Xinha Here! version comes with seven themes and 22 plugins-such as character map, table operations, find and replace, character counter etc.

Below is the screenshot of the new version using the XP Blue theme. If you arent familiar with Xinha Here!, heres my earlier post on the plugin.

Instant visual editor for your blog, website

Putting a what-you-see-is-what-you-get (WYSIWYG) editor for your blog or website content management system used to involve installing a software package in the web server. Not anymore. I found this link to a Firefox plugin that would allow you to use the Xinha editor on any HTML text entry area.

Xinha Here! (photo below) is a must-have Firefox plugin for anyone who publishes online-whether on blogs, news portals or even forums. What’s good about using Xinha Here! instead of a server-side WYSIWYG solution is that you can turn WYSIWYG editing on and off without having to change settings.

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Great Firefox plugin for blog template users

I found Aardvark through The product is a free Firefox plugin that allows you to check elements of a webpage and how it is constructed. It is particularly useful for non-geeks like me who want to customize templates of blog content management systems like WordPress or Serendipity.

Aardvark allows you to check parts of a site and see which HTML or CSS element controls its presentation. If you place your mouse pointer over a part of a page, the block will be highlighted an a text below the block will indicate which element it is.

With the tool, you’d know which part of your style sheet to edit if you want to change a part of your CMS-backed blog.

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