I’m writing this post to avoid finalizing the design of a site

Here’s an interesting essay on structured procrastination by John Perry, a philosophy professor at Stanford.

In the essay, Perry points the way forward to procrastinators like me:

“The key idea is that procrastinating does not mean doing absolutely nothing. Procrastinators seldom do absolutely nothing; they do marginally useful things, like gardening or sharpening pencils or making a diagram of how they will reorganize their files when they get around to it.”

Structured procrastination, Perry said, is organizing your tasks to exploit the fact that “procrastinator can be motivated to do difficult, timely and important tasks, as long as these tasks are a way of not doing something more important.”

It’s a matter of picking the right set of tasks to be placed at the top of the list: tasks that “seem to have clear deadlines (but really don’t). Second, they seem awfully important (but really aren’t).”

Finally, I see method to my madness.

Upgrading to WordPress version 2.0.3

I’ve just upgraded this blog and a host of others that I help manage to the latest stable version in the WordPress 2.0 release: WordPress 2.0.3. The new release is both a bug fix and a security release. I would have procrastinated on the upgrading if not for the notice that it is a security release.

WordPress founding developer Matt Mullenweg wrote in the blogging engine’s development blog that the 2.0.3 release is “recommended for all WordPress users.”

In previous upgrades, I used to deactivate all the plugins then delete all the files before uploading the new ones and then running the upgrade script. But Matt said in his post that: “Upgrading is fairly simple, just overwrite your old files with the latest from the download. When you go to your admin it will give you a link to update your database.”

I did just that and upgrading took less than five minutes, including the uploading of the files.

Easily keep track of your Google search result rankings with Sitening

For many weblogs and websites, visitors from search engines constitute a large part of the website traffic and if you’re serious about increasing your readership, you have to keep track of how you’re ranking in search results so that you’d know which aspects of your site you have to optimize.

Google, being the most used search engine, brings the most traffic. In my case, traffic from the Google search engine accounts for more than half of visitors to this blog.

Many of the readers of this blog somehow find their way here while searching for the latest K750i firmware or Sony Ericsson phone themes, subjects of this blog’s top search queries. Quite a few come here for my articles on blogging, WordPress, TiddlyWiki and its variations: ZiddlyWiki and ServerSideWiki.

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